Peanut Butter Porridge with Peruvian Cacao This is not your average 'porridge for breakfast' but a antioxidant rich meal to serve the demanding needs of an athlete as well as those dedicated to healthier living, to which I add that no athlete will...

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Pomegranate Raspberry Overnight Oats The simple yet profound truth is that no athlete will reach their potential if they fail the manage a nutritious diet. It truly is that simple and for all the promising athletes that fell short of their...

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Raspberry Banana Overnight Oats No athlete can achieve their promise if they fail to manage a proper diet. Simple, yet profound and any suggestion otherwise is nonsense for without the proper dietary support the utmost potential...

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Blueberry Overnight Oats No athlete can achieve their promise if they fail to manage a proper diet. This simple fact is equally a trying realisation for many as for decades proper dietary habits have rarely been emphasised...

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Recipe: Porridge, Eggs and Courgette Food is fuel to serve the demands of athletic development. Whether one is at the height of sport or a young athlete with dreams of the next level without the proper fuel no athlete can reach their...

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Are you Ready, part two

Category : John Davies, Training, USP Labs

Long before the modern era of exercise, where common abilities are accepted as remarkable feats of strength, there was “the iron game”. Though those of us long enough to remember it first-hand will have subtle variations of our memories, each with our own vantage attached, one commonality was “hard work” and of-course, the iron.

We all come in different shapes and sizes, backgrounds and so-forth but once training time began that was checked at the door. For myself, I was part of a motley crew, “punks” that swore “they had no future” yet as experience now provides me the insight, we obviously were developing a survival attitude of “getting the tough job done” through the fraternity of sweat soaked sessions. The “iron” was a common ground, the rat-hole of gym that would never get by in today’s world, our place of salvation to which we were the congregation.

Though I know such commentary seems to possess more than a morsel of “artistic license”, it is the painful truth, said in the nicest possible way, that it was a troublesome time. While it contradicts the modern marketing vision that makes it look sexy to train in a junkyard setting, where every puffed-up pretender in a black t-shirt, scampers in front of the camera in a well-crafted set, the truth is far from it.

Yet in the brutality of an era, where you did not where you next meal was coming from, the measure of the man was crafted. There were plenty I knew who dipped to underbelly of society, never understanding the lessons taught while and never escaped those years but equally there were those who climbed from the sludge to lead. There is a lot to be said of those days and maybe more that I best leave unsaid yet amongst how the lessons this mysterious teacher called hard work and perseverance taught, was the true meaning of the iron game.

This quite possibly is the greatest key to understanding the positive impact of the athletics. Within the iron game, there is honesty to it, a language of man against metal that knows no boundary but earned through an agenda of hard work. The honesty was this grimy hunk of iron was a place where there were no judges to our pedigree, of what side of the train tracks you hailed from and there are no favours. The weight is constant from person to person and the greatest way to overcome deficiencies is often answered with time, with the realization that should you fail today, you will be back at it tomorrow.

To continue reading please visit John Davies blog for USPlabs

John Davies is available on his personal page on Facebook , Renegade Training™ ’s as well as or Twitter.

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a matter of Simplicity, part one

Category : Cuisine, John Davies, USP Labs, Uncategorized

With much of the available diet advice hell-bent on misdirecting the public away from the facts, the truth of the matter is that it takes a lifestyle change to reverse society’s obesity epidemic. While that will seem complicated, this approach is “simple”, in-fact so refreshingly easy that I refer to the plan as “Simplicity“.

Prior to going any further, let me state unequivocally the “Simplicity” plan is terribly unoriginal and in-fact steeped in standard practices of another era. While the breakdown of the family unit and values played a major role in dietary habits, the massive shift in food distribution, farming practices and ultimate reliance upon processed items has derailed any reasonable chance of optimal health. Though that goes completely against the grain of the industry that will look to continue the public’s reliance on what is truly odd eating practices, the answer is to look towards our past and a “simpler time”. While self-appointed guru’s and their marketing experts will shift the public’s attention to catchy slogan’s to suit a publicity machine that speaks in dumbed-down one-hundred forty character bit messages, the finest dietary advice available stems from our heritage.

Sadly, the public has become a peculiar pawn in this process and with roughly fifty years of poor dietary habits, the near-death of cuisine and the spiralling destruction of the family unit, once common habits have been lost. Though that commentary may ring true to some, unfortunately the vast majority of the public has been bred into a world that the media has helped create dysfunctional body images and truthfully has a sub-standard quality of life. While I reserve commentary for a later article on present day images that are neither appealing or realistic, body imagery in the media has done an enormous disservice to the public. “Simplicity”, rolls back to the starting line, unshackles the public from the spiralling cycle that the food industry has helped create and along with the endless health benefits throughout society, greatly improves the quality of life.

To continue reading, the first ten “Simplicity” rules, please visit USPlabs

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Are you ready, part one

Category : Training, USP Labs

As the page turns and we venture into the new decade, it is both a time to reflect on the past and chart a course for the future. Purely from the perspective of my position in the broad health and fitness industry the best way I can term the last decade is, “interesting”. Whilst the closely related nutrition and supplement sector presses on with brilliant innovation, the exercise game is a “broken wheel” that lacks creativity and mostly repackages older methods with clever marketing “hooks”. It is the vast divide in the exercise culture of today and though I have stated on many occasions saying that “training is simple”, after reviewing the general level of information available today I think it is more appropriate to say it is “confusing” and often lacks the substance of its heritage.

What was “simple” in my early days of training, was the feel of cold metal, a bin for chalk and a wall-chart of exercises that still to this day reign supreme as being the most effective. There was never a shortage of older lifters ready to pass down wisdom built through experience for those ready to enter fellowship of the “iron game”. Unfortunately and despite claims otherwise, the iron game and the knowledge that weaved through its fraternity have been lost within the “digital age” and have all but perished. Rarely are new ideas cultivated and the majority of the profession focuses its efforts on marketing and for those who enter the publishing world, how to re-package the works of others.

Though the last section will be argumentative to some, yet the facts are that the vast dearth of information published over the last decade is remarkably similar and shows little creativity, if not practical application. In-fact, I would argue that there is little difference in many publications, other than slick marketing efforts, as most training measures lack a full understanding of its effect, are “borrowed” from the work of others and all too often are merely designed to gain attention. The impact of this is simply that the exercise enthusiast, whether their goals are for strength development or overall fitness levels are being passed down second-rate information. This must change with the only answer that through this column, I will look to cut through decades of misinformation and resurrect a corner of the Iron Game and Physical Culture.

What it will take
If I was to look back in time, what is remembered the most is “hard work”. Whether it was your first days of digging into the Squat racks or early moments of feeling the bar “bend” whilst at the base of a Clean, working hard was an underlying theme.

I suppose the entire issue is not exactly “simple” but in-fact relates to leadership, accountability and the part of the passage of the iron game. There was not only a sense of fraternity of being a member of a rare breed and with it, a responsibility to uphold an edict of hard work. This, “hard work” agenda, is proven each day through the pure honesty within the training world. There is no faking it within the rugged domains of a lifting platform and within it; challenges would be met each day. Whatever language you spoke, whatever part of the world you lived in, the weights stayed constant and determination needs to be laid at the foundation. It gave you a unifying sense and one you could identify and look up to the legendary lifters of the day. Countless names in the sport ring out in hushed tone, from the early post World War II days John Grimek, Steve Reeves and Reg Park built the foundation for the 1960’s, the so-called “golden-aged” of bodybuilding would build upon. Within Olympic weightlifting circles the list is daunting yet few of the era can forget Yury Vlasov’s epic performance in the 1960 Rome Games, Tommy Kono in the Helsinki and Melbourne Games or the often-groundbreaking training measures of Vasiliy Alekseyev. Simply the iron-game had its core of legends that were not only revered but also brought a sense fraternity to the sport of which membership demanded bulldogged determination.

To continue reading please visit John Davies blog for USPlabs

John Davies is available on his personal page on Facebook , Renegade Training™ ’s as well as or Twitter.

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